International Academy of Design and Technology Fraud Complaints

International Academy of Design and Technology Fraud Complaints

International Academy of Design and Technology (IADT) has faced plenty of lawsuits in recent years and has constant complaints of fraud cast against it by former and current students. Many former students complain that the school does not have the accreditation it claims to and is not recognized regionally. Students wishing to drop out and continue education elsewhere or those who wish to further their education after graduation soon find no one will accept IADT credits. If that weren’t bad enough, IADT is alleged to provide in-house financing through loans which take advantage of its students.

The school’s claim that students receive valuable lab time with professional businesses is, in reality, not what students expected when they signed up for the program. Apparently, the school uses businesses owned and operated by IADT instructors. These instructors are therefore paid double for their work and the students are left not gaining anything of real value for their future. As IADT charges its students additional lab time outside the costs indicated in their program, the conflict of interest goes all the way around the board.

Quizzes and exams at IADT are a breeze. In fact, you don’t really even know how to read as long as you can match the answers from the boxes of the test answers the instructors provide their students. Speaking of instruction, that’s pretty lacking as well and students have indicated they didn’t learn anything while in the program.

IADT is also well-known for its open door policy, and we don’t mean that those facing problems can gain support. Instead, the school allows students into its programs without the necessary educational backgrounds required by legitimate schools. As the students are not properly instructed, I guess handing out those test answers was the only way to go.

School dropout rates are significantly high and those attempting to leave formally end up up to their necks in problems. In the end, many drop out of the program without the necessary paperwork, are stuck for loans for classes they didn’t take, and have nothing to show for it. Those who manage to get through the formal dropout process have found they don’t actually end up removed from the roster. Instead, students are charged as if they have taken the classes and are given an automatic F.

The school has faced numerous lawsuits in regards to allegations of defrauding its students and gaining access to federal financial aid program money. The lawsuits claim the school misrepresented its programs usefulness and acceptance, that it lies about its accreditation, that it runs shady loans, and that it is embroiled in unethical practices against its students. Complaints boards online are filled to bursting with current and former students who claim IADT is a scam and fraud who’s sole purpose is to remove money from the pockets of those who they are intended to be educating. Students leaving the program find that not only do other schools no accept IADT’s education and credentials, but also that no employers will either.

If you feel you were defrauded by the school you attended or you are being treated poorly as a distressed borrower by your creditors, contact StudentLoanFAQ's and speak to one of our advisors about student loan forgiveness. You may qualify to consolidate or even wipe out your remaining student loans.

Truck Driving School Runs Private Student Loan Scam

Truck Driving School Runs Private Student Loan Scam

In one of the saddest examples of unwitting students being left with high student loan debt and no real hope of landing a job to help pay it off, a truck driving school operating in the Midwest was sued for fraudulent activity that led to a default rate of some 93% of its students.  Five Star Truck Driving School, which was one of many schools run by a parent company called the Franklin Schools, worked in collaboration with a private lender, Student Finance Corp. (SFC), to issue high-interest loans to students in exchange for a driving program that was too short to provide adequate training and which employed faulty equipment and unlicensed instructors.  On top of that, the companies quietly arranged for the payment of loans that were in default in order to hide the fact that their default rates were so high and fool investors into continuing to securitize their loans.

Five Star and SFC were accused of enrolling students that they knew to be inappropriate candidates for driving jobs and then arranging for them to pass their CDL tests by employing one of their graduates to be the tester.  As they were supposed to be preparing their students to earn licenses that would enable them to work as a chauffeur or to drive a semi-trailer, Five Star should have alerted prospective students to the fact that a poor past driving record could preclude them from being able to find a job as a driver.  Instead, the company advertised that graduates of their program could expect lifetime job placement assistance and led students to believe that their future employers would be willing to pay them back for the cost of their training.  Once a student had secured their loan, the school conducted its own check of their driving record and if it was determined that they would not be able to find a trucking job because of it, the student would be required to sign a waiver releasing the company from its job placement obligations.  Students who refused to sign were told that if they didn’t agree to the waiver, they would have to leave the school and would be responsible for the full cost of tuition and the interest on their loan, totally about $17,500 for the two-week course.

Once the state of Ohio learned about the fraudulent testing practices, the licenses of around 200 Five Star students were revoked and they were made to pay for and pass a retest, which many of them could not do, due to the shoddy training that the school had provided.  While some of the investors who had been defrauded into securitizing the loans that Five Star and SFC arranged were able to sue and get back a portion of the money that they lost, the vast majority of the students were forced to default on their loans and face collection agencies as a result.  This entire scam and the tragic outcome for the students involved is a perfect illustration of a student loan system that is too easily corruptible and with nowhere near the protection for consumers that are absolute necessities.\

If you feel you were defrauded by the school you attended or you are being treated poorly as a distressed borrower by your creditors, contact StudentLoanFAQ's and speak to one of our advisors about student loan forgiveness. You may qualify to consolidate or even wipe out your remaining student loans.

Ross University of Medicine Fraud and Lawsuit Complaints

Ross University of Medicine Fraud and Lawsuit Complaints

Ross University of Medicine, a for-profit school run in the Caribbean, certainly has its share of lawsuits. They don’t seem particularly concerned about the legal fees associated with all these suits, though. After all, they make more than enough money off the backs of their students to pay the legal fees without it affecting their bottom line. Considering the school has seats for roughly 200-300 students, yet enrolls up to 600 students per term, we’ll say they’ve got the fees covered. How do all these extra students manage to sit in classrooms? They don’t. Instead, students are forced to access recorded lectures online and often never learn the hands-on skills one would hope their family physician was trained in prior to graduation.

The Attorneys General of Massachusetts and Illinois apparently had some questions about Ross University and many of its practices, and launched investigations against the school and its parent company, DeVry Inc., after complaints the school was committing fraud. Investigations were intended to address claims that the school provides its enrollment counselors financial compensation based on enrollment, has committed accounting malpractice, and has misused federal and private student financial aid. Federal and state authorities have also launched numerous investigations into the school for similar issues and plenty of former students have launched lawsuits against the company.

Dropout rates at the school are 10 times higher than those of traditional medical schools and only 52% of students manage to graduate from their program on time.  When we consider how Ross liked to play around with its financial reporting, can these numbers really be believed? After all, they are self-reported. Should we trust these figures, or is it safe to assume that the dropout rate is higher and the graduation rate even lower and that this data, too, has been fudged to Ross’ advantage?

Unfortunately, even the number of lawsuits against Ross and its parent company don’t portray an accurate picture of disgruntled students. Only those with the financial means necessary to hire a lawyer and launch a suit can manage to take Ross to court. Considering the majority of Ross students are federal financial aid recipients, that’s a whole lot of underprivileged students without a voice. Also not included in lawsuits are students who were manipulated or duped into signing Ross’ Ombudsman’s non-disparagement agreements. Students stating they filed complaints to the school indicated they were forced to deal directly with this person who then tells them they couldn’t continue their program unless the form was signed.

This agreement waives the students’ rights to launch any legal action against Ross or DeVry at any point. Students who refused to sign the waiver, any lawsuits pursued are handled by a specific court in New Jersey, which has never found a case against Ross’ favor. In addition, these students are often booted from their programs.

Those who choose to sign often find their lives becoming increasingly difficult at Ross, often find themselves removed from their program, have their clinical placements altered or removed, and have their clinical hosts suddenly giving them a hard time. As students here are studying to become physicians, they are unable to graduate without completing clinical placements. As the student is already lacking enough clinical placement spots with the hospitals in the US it has as hosts, it’s rather easy for them to simply state they don’t have a placement right now and make students wait. This wait time can come at the heft price of $30,000 in new tuition charges should it go beyond the end of the semester.

While laws in the US protect students against overcrowding and enrolling students beyond legislated seat requirements, the Caribbean lacks the same oversight. This means many enrolled students take most of their lectures online. They never get to work on a cadaver for anatomical and diagnostic purposes, they never touch the diagnostic equipment necessary to work as medical health professionals, they can’t ask questions, and they never examine another human prior to clinical placement. We generally expect that our doctors have at least seen and worked with an actual person and touched the equipment prior to them being responsible for our lives.

One lawsuit against the school claims it has engaged in a scheme that is questionable, deceptive, and fraudulent in order to charge students more who receive Higher Education Act Title IV funding. It also states that the school misrepresents the usefulness and quality of its educational programs, job placement statistics, accreditation, and has misrepresented itself to financial aid. Many students graduating from their programs managed to achieve internships at recognized hospitals. Unfortunately, many of them were dismissed with the claim that the graduate was unprepared to work as an intern and lacked the required skills and knowledge necessary to work in the field of medicine.

If you feel you were defrauded by the school you attended or you are being treated poorly as a distressed borrower by your creditors, contact StudentLoanFAQ's and speak to one of our advisors about student loan forgiveness. You may qualify to consolidate or even wipe out your remaining student loans.